Crozet Population Numbers Keep Growing

Crozet is growing. There are now nearly 10K people within 3 miles of Downtown Crozet.

Crozet is a Designated Growth Area in Albemarle County. 

Read the PDF from the County for yourself.

Ongoing series, of undetermined length, in which I am putting together information that will hopefully serve to inform, pique curiosity, and spur Crozetians to ask questions, and get informed and involved … for things that affect everyone’s backyards, not just their own.

 

Charlottesville Tomorrow in November 2016

Earlier this month (November 2016) county staff unrolled a large map on a table in the Crozet Library and invited members of the committee to inspect it.

“This is the best information that we have as to what is going on in Crozet residential development-wise,” said county planner Elaine Echols. “There are projects that are under rezoning, there are projects that have been rezoned and there are projects that are being built by-right.”

Echols said the current population of Crozet is around 6,000 and it is expected that will double by 2030. The master plan has a maximum population cap.

“The number that’s in the master plan is 18,000,” Echols said. “You have about 6,000 people right now and if you add another 6,000 to that, that’s 12,000. That’s our math.”

Via Charlottesville Tomorrow in January 2017

Demographers at the University of Virginia are forecasting a sharp increase in Albemarle’s population by the year 2045, but a smaller rise for the city of Charlottesville.

Lombard said whether projections meet reality will depend on land use decisions made by Virginia localities.

The center’s data projects Albemarle County growing to a population of 118,828 in 2025, 134,104 in 2035 and 148,337 in 2045. The center’s population estimate for 2016 is 105,715, an increase of 6,745 people since the 2010 Census.

“The county is working diligently on implementing the Comprehensive Plan vision, which anticipated this kind of growth,” said Andrew Gast-Bray, the county’s community development director. In 1980, the Board of Supervisors designated five percent of the county’s land for development and restricted growth in the remaining 95 percent.

Related

PDFs showing Crozet population growth

Related to the first two pdfs above

Their projections can be misleading. In general an annualized rate of 2.7% is fairly aggressive on a macro level, but low considering all the ongoing activity. To add 3-4K residents, that’s about 8-10% annual growth, which would be exceptional. The designated growth area historically has grown 4.0% since 2010, so I think a defensible aggressive projection would be somewhere between 4.0 and 8%. A growing job base in Crozet would make that aggressive projection much more realistic. I thought the median age difference between the general 5 mile radius (42.3 years) and designated growth area (39 years) was pretty interesting.

NB: We need an accurate census

Trump’s Pick to Run 2020 Census Has Defended Racial Gerrymandering and Voter Suppression Laws

The census will determine redistricting and voting rights enforcement.

 


The Series

  1. The Beginning – A Conversation with a friend over coffee
  2. Prologue – Support local journalists & journalism
  3. How Much Money for Infrastructure Has Crozet Gotten?
  4. Crozet Population Numbers Keep Growing
  5. Crozet Acronyms – What do They Mean?
  6. Crozet Water Supply
  7. Notes from a Crozet Coffee Conversation
  8. Ongoing Crozet Projects of Note
  9. Getting Involved in Crozet – Where to Start?
  10. … I don’t yet know …

Crozet, Money, Infrastructure Needs

Western has been allocated nearly $7M for the Environmental Service Academy.

Second in a series of undetermined length, in which I am putting together information that will hopefully serve to inform, pique curiosity, and spur Crozetians to ask questions, and get informed and involved … for things that affect everyone’s backyards, not just their own.

If there are errors or things I’ve gotten wrong, please forgive me, and correct me.

This is the only post (so far) in which I’m throwing information out with little analysis or context, in the hopes that someone will see it for the first time, get curious, dig in, and ask questions. And maybe even post those questions here, or ask the school board (our rep is David Oberg), or the Board of Supervisors (Ann Mallek). Or, even better, have a conversation in person with a friend or neighbor.

My hope is that someone takes this as a prompt to find out more, and share with the community what they find, whether in a follow up post, or in the comments. These are ideas and thoughts, and not fully-fleshed stories.

If there are errors, please correct me. Questions, ask them.

I know that as more houses are built, and few bike/pedestrian/car/parking solutions are proposed or implemented, Crozet is going to have issues. Traffic is an issue.

Start with these PDFs


Schools are getting a bit crowded

 

“When is WAHS getting the $10-20m. Update and expansion it needs?”

But …  in July 2017

Work is underway to design new science labs and modernized classrooms for Western Albemarle High School and its Environmental Studies Academy.

A 10,000 square-foot addition to the school will include three new labs, an office and prep rooms with storage. Seven existing science classrooms and six more classrooms throughout the school building will be renovated.

The project is budgeted at approximately $5.5 million, and was funded through the 2016 bond referendum.

Looks like Western Albemarle High School has been allocated nearly $7M for the Environmental Service Academy, and Henley $2.5M for a new gym.

Western has been allocated nearly $7M for the Environmental Service Academy.
Western has been allocated nearly $7M for the Environmental Service Academy.

Crozet Elementary wants $6M for an addition, and Western wants $4.4M for an addition.

Crozet & Western want money

 

How much money has Crozet gotten for infrastructure? And how much do we need?

Discerning how much we’ve gotten is findable (below needs updating for 2017/18). How much do we need? I have no idea.

Crozet Growth Area Analysis & CIP Projection

Crozet Infrastructure Needs

 

And that funding is always an issue. The bureaucratic wheels move slowly.

Smart Scale Funding – do you know how this works?   It’s important. Here is a recent update from Charlottesville Tomorrow.

What ifThe County didn’t pay millions to the City of Charlottesville every year via the Revenue Sharing Agreement?

Sources of data:

Second in the series.


The Series

  1. The Beginning – A Conversation with a friend over coffee
  2. Prologue – Support local journalists & journalism
  3. How Much Money for Infrastructure Has Crozet Gotten?
  4. Crozet Population Numbers Keep Growing
  5. Crozet Acronyms – What do They Mean?
  6. Crozet Water Supply
  7. Notes from a Crozet Coffee Conversation
  8. Ongoing Crozet Projects of Note
  9. Getting Involved in Crozet – Where to Start?
  10.  … I don’t yet know …

Support Local Charlottesville and Albemarle News Gathering & Dissemination

As I was putting together the coming series, I wanted to interject & highlight our amazing local news people.

So much happens in the Charlottesville area, and most (99%) of us cannot attend the meetings consistently, process the information, research, put into context. We need local reporters. To them all: Thank you.

Who’s going to go to planning commission meetings? Board of Supervisors? Service Authority Board meetings? Without local reporters and reporting, our community & our democracy suffer.

Local Journalism Matters. We have a remarkable array of reporters.

Charlottesville Tomorrow – I rely on these folks heavily (Sean Tubbs) donate to them when I can, and profess their institutional knowledge to anyone who will listen.

Daily ProgressAlison Wrabel, Chris Suarez, Michael Bragg and others have been at the DP for a few years now and have built knowledge, context, and are critical to reporting in Charlottesville and Albemarle.

Yes, they are expensive ($10/month vs $6 or so for Washington Post or NYTimes) and their website burns the eyes, and they deleted their archives in 2008 But. Supporting them is worthwhile. Despite the fact that they’re owned by one of the richest people in the world.

Crozet Gazette – Great local reporting. Simple.

Edit: as I mentioned in the comment below – “I meant “simple” in only a positive context – I was thinking of something well-executed, and done well, like a house with clean lines that is beautiful. ” There’s a reason that I when  I think about it, I note here on the blog the new issue of the Gazette, and encourage everyone to pick it up.  A sign of excellence is making things look simple.

 

Note: my Twitter list of Charlottesville media has nearly 70 members, and I’ve found it to be a great resource.


The Series

  1. The Beginning – A Conversation with a friend over coffee
  2. Prologue – Support local journalists & journalism
  3. How Much Money for Infrastructure Has Crozet Gotten?
  4. Crozet Population Numbers Keep Growing
  5. Crozet Acronyms – What do They Mean?
  6. Crozet Water Supply
  7. Notes from a Crozet Coffee Conversation
  8. Ongoing Crozet Projects of Note
  9. Getting Involved in Crozet – Where to Start?
  10. … I don’t yet know …

Coffee Conversation Leads to Crozet Stories

I posted on FB

Coffee leads to stories.

I had coffee with a friend recently who wants to get involved in Crozet and wanted to learn more about what’s going on in Crozet. We talked for two hours, and I took notes.

I hope to write a series of stories, but will aim for at least a comprehensive post with links referencing these notes. (I have drafts of three stories already in the works)

What are you curious about in Crozet? Why do you live here? What if anything, would you like to see improved?

I’m a realtor who lives in Crozet, & loves Crozet. Being aware and involved is part of the business, is is part of being an active and informed member of the community.

Hoping to publish the series soon.

What are those acronyms?


The Series

  1. How Much Money for Infrastructure Has Crozet Gotten?
  2. Crozet Population Numbers Keep Growing
  3. Crozet Acronyms – What do They Mean?
  4. Crozet Water Supply
  5. Notes from a Crozet Coffee Conversation
  6. Ongoing Crozet Projects of Note
  7. Getting Involved in Crozet – Where to Start?
  8.  … I don’t yet know …

2017 Year in Review in Crozet

Best 9 of RealCrozetVA on Instagram

121 blog posts, 108 Instagram posts, and I’m not going to count how many tweets & FB posts.

A lot happened in Crozet in 2017.

Good stuff, some less good stuff, but  2017 ends with lots of new construction (about 1/3 of home sales in Crozet last year were new builds), more civic awareness and frustration, traffic, strong community, great shops, Perrone Robotics, a new privately- designed master plan, Great Valu changing & becoming the Crozet Market, the Crozet Calendar was well used, CCAC meetings provided a wealth of information, and Storify died.

For 2018, let’s be good to each other, get informed and involved even when something doesn’t affect your backyard, remember why we all choose Crozet, and be nice.

What follows is a snip of some of the highlights of 2017, as seen through the RealCrozetVA blog lens. The blog is the home of everything; the RealCrozetVA ecosystem includes Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. I know this; the archives on the blog provide a valuable historical archive for the past decade+ in Crozet.

As I made my way through the year in review (for the second time), one thing is clear – a lot of the stuff happening now started months and years ago (see: NIFI, Adelaide, the Vue, transportation).

As a reminder, I’m a Realtor. My career and profession is representing buyers and sellers. I write/manage RealCrozetVA, now entering its 12th year, as a service to the Crozet community, and because I think RealCrozetVA comprises a “good thing.”

Questions/comments welcomed, here, at the FB post, or contact me.


Here we go.

Continue reading “2017 Year in Review in Crozet”

Landes Town Hall – 27 December 2017

Last night’s town hall at Crozet Library with our representative, Steve Landes was well attended.

First, thank you to Mr. Landes for having town halls; it’s welcomed.

Second – all of Mr. Landes’ bills in the Virginia General Assembly are here at Richmond Sunlight.

Third – more of this, folks. Local politics matter.

Newsplex has a story.

My highlights from last night (you can see all the tweets by clicking here)

Recycle Those Christmas Trees!

via email:

It’s almost that time of year again! The Albemarle County Parks & Recreation Department will host its annual Christmas Tree Recycling Program. The program, which began in 1988, collects discarded Christmas trees which are then chipped into mulch and offered to the public at no cost. Since the program began, an average of 2300 trees have been collected annually, yielding over 110 cubic yards of mulch each year. Not only does this recycling program provide citizens a place to dispose of a potentially large and cumbersome item, it also reduces the impact on our landfill.

From December 26, 2017 through January 15, 2018, the County will operate the following seven sites daily, from 7:00 a.m. until dark, where residents can drop off their Christmas trees:

  • Crozet Park in Crozet
  • Greenwood Community Center in Greenwood
  • Chris Greene Lake Park in Earlysville
  • Darden Towe Park on Elks Drive
  • Scottsville Community Center in Scottsville
  • Walnut Creek Park off Old Lynchburg Road
  • Rivanna Solid Waste Authority Recycling Center on McIntire Road*
  • (Note: Sunday hours are 12:30 to 5:30 p.m.)
  • *this location may be congested, please consider Darden Towe Park as an alternate location that is less congested and is better suited for large loads and contract haulers.

By combining forces with the Charlottesville Curb Side Pick-Up Program, the joint programs collected over 4200 trees last year, yielding approximately 201 cubic yards of mulch. According to the City Public Works Department, curbside pick-up for City residents will be the week of January 8, 2018. Trees must be at the curbside by 7:00 a.m.. Shortly after the City’s curbside pick-up, the County and City Parks & Recreation crews will team up to chip an estimated 2200 trees at Darden Towe Park.

As a reminder, this program is for Christmas trees only, please no yard waste. Both the County and City programs require that all decorations, stands and nails be removed from the Christmas trees. Free mulch will be available to citizens starting February 1, 2018, at Darden Towe Park.

Crozet Jingle Jog – 25 December 2017

Jingle Jog on Christmas Day!

Come join us for the 5th annual Crozet Jingle Jog on Christmas Day! We will start at the Old Trail Town Center at 11:00am and run/bike/walk/dog/stroller around Old Trail for a 5k distance. There is no registration fee, no bibs, and no timing – just fun Christmas Day fellowship with your neighbors and friends and a chance to get out of the house, move your legs, and earn that Christmas dinner!

Consider bringing a non-perishable food item for the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank!

Bikes, dogs, strollers, scooters, etc are all welcome and all are invited! Hope to see you on Christmas Day!

Presented by Crozet Running, Crozet Pediatric Dentistry, Crozet Bicycle Shop, and Cakes by Rachel!

Perrone Robotics Open House in Crozet

It was cool to see the future in Crozet.

The open house on 22 December at Perrone Robotics in Downtown Crozet was surprisingly well attended. Crozetians are curious about the robot cars.

We are lucky to have such a thing here in Crozet. Here’s hoping we – and the County – embrace this company, and work to bring others to Crozet.

Plus, they are hiring.

Lots of people interested in Perrone

Continue reading “Perrone Robotics Open House in Crozet”

Delegate Landes Town Hall – 27 December 2017

Local politics matters, folks. Get involved. The more, (and the more informed), the better.

Wednesday, December 27, 2017, 6:30 p.m.
Crozet Library, Large Room
2020 Library Avenue, Crozet, Virginia


From Del. Landes’ site:

WEYERS CAVE, VA – Delegate R. Steven Landes, R-Weyers Cave, will hold three town hall meetings as part his outreach initiative for residents of the 25th House District in preparation for the 2018 legislative session. Delegate Landes continues a three-pronged approach to maximize constituent input consisting of Town Hall meetings, a pre-session legislative survey and the continuation of his 25th House District Advisory Committee (HDAC).

Continue reading “Delegate Landes Town Hall – 27 December 2017”