Downtown Crozet Redevelopment Moving Forward

Alison Wrabel (one of the only reasons I subscribe to the Daily Progress) writes: (read the whole thing)

The first phase of the redevelopment of the former Barnes Lumber site in Crozet was approved Wednesday.

The Albemarle County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously to approve a rezoning of about 6.24 acres of the site from heavy industry and commercial to Downtown Crozet District to allow for mixed-use development.

Developer Frank Stoner, with Milestone Partners, did not have a formal presentation but thanked the board, county staff, the Crozet Community Advisory Committee and the Downtown Crozet Initiative for their input and work over the years.

“We’re in our fifth year of this project, and I can honestly tell you we wouldn’t be here today without all the people I just mentioned,” he said.

The redevelopment of the Barnes Lumber site has been included in the Crozet Master Plan. A proposal was submitted in 2010 but did not move forward. Crozet New Town Associates purchased the property from the bank and reactivated the rezoning application in 2014 for the whole property.

In 2017, the rezoning request was modified to focus on the first phase of the site — the 6.24-acre portion — including a proposed civic plaza.

Downtown Crozet Redevelopment Gets Planning Commission Approval

Finally, Downtown Crozet is closer to being redeveloped! After 50+ community meetings, and remarkable persistence by the developer, things seem to be moving forward. A hotel in downtown Crozet is much-needed.

First

Read Allison Wrabel’s story in the Daily Progress, not just the snippets I’ve pulled. (bolding mine)

The Albemarle County Planning Commission voted 6-0 to recommend approval of a rezoning of about 6.24 acres of the site from heavy industry and commercial to Downtown Crozet District to allow for mixed use development.

The current proposed project would include commercial and retail space, a hotel and approximately 52 residential units in its first phase.

Possible issues staff cited were increased traffic and increased demand for parking. A potential impact on schools, particularly Crozet Elementary, also was a concern, but that was not as high of a concern yet, as only about six elementary school students are anticipated to live in the residential part of the project.

Remember how some people thought that Old Trail was going to be a retirement community? Me too. 🙂

Second

Note that the County have been “discussing parking” in Downtown Crozet forever. (bolding mine)

In addition to action on the Old Trail rezoning, The Planning Commission specifically requested that the Board address the following issues related to Crozet as a whole:

–          The parking restrictions in the existing downtown Crozet area should be reviewed and potentially studied for revision to allow the Crozet area to better support its businesses that exist and could come.

–          Put all of the County resources possible towards getting Jarman’s Gap Road higher on the VDOT list of priorities. 

–          Have staff work with the schools and applicant to talk about interconnectivity on the trails and traffic.

–          The Board should direct staff to work at making sure the downtown Crozet improvements are actually done.  

From the 2005 Summary of the Old Trail rezoning

Downtown Crozet Initiative Meeting – 12 July 2018

Things are about to start ramping up with Downtown Crozet … if you can make this meeting, please do.

Join us next Thursday for our monthly DCI meeting as we discuss county updates, the Main Street grant work plans, a recent meeting with the Artisan Depot, and plaza fundraising plans. As the plaza gets closer to becoming a reality, we’d love input from more community members. Come get involved in the future of downtown Crozet!

If you plan to attend, please RSVP here.

Thursday, July 12
12 pm – 2 pm
Crozet Pizza

Perrone Robotics Open House in Crozet

It was cool to see the future in Crozet.

The open house on 22 December at Perrone Robotics in Downtown Crozet was surprisingly well attended. Crozetians are curious about the robot cars.

We are lucky to have such a thing here in Crozet. Here’s hoping we – and the County – embrace this company, and work to bring others to Crozet.

Plus, they are hiring.

Lots of people interested in Perrone

Continue reading “Perrone Robotics Open House in Crozet”

Perrone Robotics Bringing Great Things to Crozet

via C-Ville (read the whole thing)

Crozet residents are aware that big things are happening in their town. Foremost among these has been Perrone Robotics Inc.’s move to invest in the construction of a new multimillion-dollar downtown complex. While the logistics of the project are still being hashed out—for instance, an estimated $3.15 million in funding for Crozet Plaza, a central park and greenspace, has yet to be secured—in December 2016, PRI struck a deal with developer Milestone Partners and, in early July, cut the red ribbon on a temporary 5,000-square-foot office and testing facility located on the site of the proposed construction. Once the plaza goes in, and surrounding offices, residential apartments and restaurants are installed, Perrone plans to build a permanent office and testing facility.

What’s significant about this move? PRI is bringing top-tier Silicone Valley innovation to the Charlottesville area.

Positioned at the forefront of the autonomous car revolution, PRI is seeking to play a key role nationally and globally in its development and implementation. “It’s not often that you get the opportunity to go to work for a company that’s doing things this exciting, and is located in an area that’s this beautiful,” says Chief Operating Officer Greg Scharer.

For PRI founder Paul Perrone, that’s exactly the point. Contrary to the volatility of the Silicon Valley workplace—where talented employees are constantly jumping ship, chasing the highest bidder—Perrone has built a company culture devoted to long-term stability and family values. “The people that come to work for us are some of the best and brightest in the world,” he says. “We want them to be invested in the company’s future, love where they live and feel confident they can raise their families in this community.” With its proximity to the mountains and Charlottesville, Perrone says Crozet is a perfect fit.

$9 Million for a Road to Downtown Crozet & Square Improvements?

Charlottesville Tomorrow reports (read the whole thing)

A new report, which was prepared by Municap, Inc., proposes the developer and county split the costs of public improvements for the property, with the developer paying approximately $4.45 million and the county paying $4.72 million. The county’s costs would specifically go towards constructing a civic plaza space and a road that connects downtown to nearby Parkside Village.

The Parkside Village connector is estimated to cost $1.57 million and the Crozet Plaza $3.15 million. The report projects that the various forms of tax revenue resulting from redevelopment of the property — including real property, sales, meals, transient and personal property taxes — would leave the county with a net surplus of $18.15 million in tax revenue after the bondholders are repaid.

Here’s the corresponding RealCrozetVA FB post.